News

Moving to Stainless Steel

As of March of 2014, all systems we manufacture will feature recovery tanks made of 304 stainless steel.  And while we're at it, all of the internal water tanks contained on out systems will also be 304 stainless.  Previously, all such tanks were made of heavy gauge 3/16" aluminum, which, due to it's thickness, rarely presented problems with regard to corrosion- caused weld- failure, etc.  But stainless steel allows us to bring all welding "in- house", which gives us more control over the time required to fabricate systems.

In addition, as a result of recent changes to the Viper design, which included a new stainless steel silencer, the exhaust silencers of all of our systems will also be made of 304 stainless.

Also, for all Dominator (and soon, Cobra) systems, the coils of the heaters will be made of 304 stainless steel as well.  This is to provide longer longevity of the coils in hard water environments. (In non- hard water environments, I've seen them routinely last 15 years without the need for replacement.)  But it also does away with the need to have a break- in period when the systems are first put into use.

As you might expect, these changes are not inexpensive ones.  There have been price increases as a result, which, as of this writing, have already been listed here on our site under the appropriate store headings.

 

The Cobra

The Cobra is a new, oil- fired design we've been working on, that's coming up for debut soon.  What makes it different from our other systems is that it's been designed from the ground up to be a design with an oil- fired heating system.  (It cannot be offered in propane- fired.)

The Cobra design features a direct- coupled drive like our Viper and Predator systems.  And it features the same recovery tanks as our Dominator systems.

But what makes it unique apart from other oil- fired systems is the way the exhaust is run from the heater.  It's run through the floor, along with the blower and engine exhausts.  As a result, it will be "clean", with regard to the lack of diesel / kerosene exhaust possibly coming back into the van.  And there will be no ned to set up a "smoke stack" for each job, as with other oil- fired systems.

In addition, the silencing system, located under the van, will be "stealth"- quiet.

More later.

 

Xtreme Odor Control

Xtreme Odor Control has been proven to be a real winner.  So far, it's been used successfully to treat every malodor it's been applied to. 

The most recent "XOC" success story was related by Peter Breen, one of our customers in Vermont.  Peter was pretty excited when he called to say that he'd used it on a Skunk Odor job and been successful on the first try.  He used it at 8 oz. per gallon of water and "really hosed it down".  He related that the work was done at a "high end" rental property that has very high standards, so only complete success would be acceptable.

 

Accessories for the Ceiling Mount Hose Reel Kit

If you've seen the video about the ceiling mount hose reel kit, you'll remember that some accessories (the carpet rake hanger and the PVC tube for tack strip) were demonstrated and one (the wand hanger) was mentioned.

If you haven't seen the video, it's here:

http://acceleratedtruckmounts.com/index.php?route=product/product&path=8000&product_id=2633

The wand hanger is proving to be a project in itself, mainly because of so many things to consider.  For instance, the length of the wand, the diameter of the wand, and above all- the security of the wand once it's mounted in place. (In other words, it has to be securely locked in place- not simply mounted in place.)  The reason for this is simple:  It must stay securely mounted in spite of accidents, emergency stops, etc.

At the same time, it must be easily mounted and released when desired.  And to that end, we have the front mount complete.  The back mount, which is the one at the back door of the van, is complete, from a concept standpoint.  Now it's simply a matter of finding the right clamp for the application, making a prototype, and seeing what changes, if any, are needed in the design.

Stay tuned...